Make the Tough Decision

Make the Tough Decisions

Make the tough decision. Right or wrong, a tough decision changes the dynamic and moves things in a new direction. Making tough decisions brings clarity for moving forward. With wisdom and practice your decision making can improve and you will make far more good decisions than poor ones.

If the buck stops with you, step forward and decide. We often know the right decision early on. Further procrastination only increases anxiety and frustration on the part of those affected.

Clarity is of paramount importance to an individual or an organization. When things are clear, you can move forward with assurance and focus. A whole line of smaller decisions suddenly fit and can be handled quickly. Don’t let fear paralyze you. Take your role as a decision maker as a call to be decisive.

 When we make a decision, we select a solution that will lead to the best consequences in our judgment. We also take responsibility for the consequences, independent of whether they turn out to be good or bad. Only those who are prepared to bear the consequences of a decision have the right to make it.  Luda Kopeikina, The Right Decision Every Time

Five Days of Action

Day One

This is the day to take stock of how well you make tough decisions. What’s your default behavior when you need to make an important decision? Do you make it and move on? Do you agonize? Does it vary depending on the type of decision? How? Why? What’s fear got to do with it? Think about the times you had the right decision at the beginning but didn’t act on it. What needs to change?

Day Two

Make a decision. There’s no time like the present. Make the biggest decision you can on something that is waiting on you. It doesn’t have to be life changing, just don’t get caught in a head game. Assess the facts as best you are able and move forward.

Day Three

Just in case you err on the side of acting too quickly before a good assessment of the facts, set some time aside today to consider a big decision before you. Look at it from different angles. Assess its pros and cons. Develop a checklist that you can walk through prior to making any decision so you can arrive at the best possible conclusion.

Day Four

If decision making stops with you, and others are waiting … make another big decision today. Be bold. Step forward. Be clear. Give direction.

Day Five

Clarity rules. Those who follow directions need clear ones. Practice clarity today. Be as detailed as you need to be. Decide what is important to accomplish and clearly tell the troops how you want it done. Set the standard for conveying what you want.

Whether dealing with burnout, planning a new initiative or refocusing the organization on priorities, sometimes one conversation can change everything. If you think a conversation might be of benefit to you, one or your leaders or your organization, I invite you to contact me.