Prepare for People Who Do Not Understand

Prepare for People Who Don't Understand

Prepare for people who do not understand. There are times that you make decisions “they” just don’t get. They don’t know your circumstances and they don’t have the information you have. When people do not understand you can lose a lot of time waiting for them to get up to speed.

Move forward. They may have to play catch-up. Listen to their concerns. Act on those that seem valid to you. But don’t stop. And don’t let them keep at it. You may have to call a stop to conversations that keep going in an endless loop. It not only wastes time, but it drags you down.

Just know that those types of people will appear. They are not bad people. They just don’t see it. And they may never see it.

 Rather than attempting to change an ongoing situation, we’ve discovered that it is far easier to create a brand-new one.  James Belasco and Jerre Stead, Soaring With the Phoenix

Five Days of Action

Day One

Think about the instances where you did something that someone else just didn’t get. How did you handle it? How did it hold you back? Did it make you more determined? As an intelligent, thoughtful decision maker, what do you now think about that person’s response?

Day Two

It may not be today, but you will come across people who just don’t get it. They don’t have the information you have. Decide in advance how you might best handle that situation when it does come up. How will you move ahead with what’s best or what needs to happen while still honoring and respecting the person who doesn’t or can’t get it?

Day Three

Today, ask what information and background thinking you can share. Practice being as clear as possible with what you say to help others understand.

Day Four

Are you waiting for someone to make up their mind but deep down you realize that they just truly don’t get it? It may be tough, but it’s time to make progress. Move forward. Give as much explanation as you think is necessary, but then get on with it.

Day Five

Stop conversations that keep repeating themselves. The individual doesn’t get it and because they don’t get it they are wearing you down. You can’t be your best for them or anyone else if they keep sucking you dry of emotional energy. Create a new standard for yourself and protect it with a boundary. Train yourself to courteously end these conversations as soon as you recognize their futility.

Whether dealing with burnout, planning a new initiative or refocusing the organization on priorities, sometimes one conversation can change everything. If you think a conversation might be of benefit to you, one or your leaders or your organization, I invite you to contact me.