Plan for the Unexpected Circumstances

Plan for the Unexpected

Plan for the unexpected. Let’s face it. The unexpected happens. We can’t predict when or know what will happen, but it does. Being aware of that can actually save you time.

Start planning for the unexpected. Create reserves of key people, critical information, money, materials, emergency planning and whatever else will give you a level of security should an unforeseen event strike.

The Boy Scouts have a motto: “Be prepared.” It will serve you as well. When the unexpected happens, you have a better chance of being ready for it, both in attitude and physical preparedness.

 The pressures of life in corporate America are not about to go away. If anything, they show every sign of increasing. High pressure is now a fact of life and a way of life. The only way to survive – and thrive – in today’s workplace is not to get rid of stress but to deepen your capacity to handle stress.  James Loehr, Stress for Success

Five Days of Action

Day One

Life happens. How have you historically responded to unforeseen events, both pleasant and painful? We can’t be prepared for everything, but we can have an attitude that encompasses the unknown. What shift in attitude or thinking do you need to make that will help you in your response to the unexpected? Purposefully take the next week to work on it.

Day Two

Create a list and start assembling what’s needed to create a level of security for the various unexpected situations you may encounter.

Day Three

Today, choose to consciously avoid paranoia about what you cannot control. You’ve prepared as best you can. Leave the rest in God’s hands and get on with your day.

Day Four

In the same way you have been doing this preparedness work for yourself, create a strategic preparedness plan for your company, organization, team or project. Even having the conversation will help. Attitude is often everything in keeping a clear head when the unexpected happens.

Day Five

Celebrate how you are much more prepared mentally and physically today than you were five days ago. Review your systems from time to time and adjust for improvement.

Whether dealing with burnout, planning a new initiative or refocusing the organization on priorities, sometimes one conversation can change everything. If you think a conversation might be of benefit to you, one or your leaders or your organization, I invite you to contact me.